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Top 4 Benefits of Purified Water - ayalaa - 09-03-2016 11:56 AM

Asthma Chronic Bronchitis - Water Filters - Top 4 Benefits of Purified Water
Do you know that your drinking water may contain poisons, feces, and toxic metals? If these contaminants are not removed from tap water in your house they will adversely affect your health. Our body is mostly composed of water so it's essential to drink clean water. It's recommended to drink approximately 8 glasses of water to maintain good health.

Greater Vitality
You'll have more energy because your body doesn't have to work as hard to filter out chemicals and unwanted substances that may cause stress to the lungs, liver and kidneys. Your immune system will remain healthy. Water filters also reduce the soap scum that builds up on sinks, bathtubs, and dishes so you won't have to spend time scrubbing them clean. Writing an article on Bronchitis was our foremost priority while thinking of a topic to write on. This is because Bronchitis are interesting parts of our lives, and are needed by us.
  • You're concerned about the well being of your family invest in a water filter for your house.
  • You'll be glad you did.
  • Aquasana Water Filters produce healthy, great tasting water for better health, weight loss, detoxification and wellness.

Benefits of Water Filters
Peace of mind By filtering your tap water you have the peace of mind that you are eliminating cancer causing chemicals and organic compounds while leaving you with healthy minerals like magnesium. Aside from producing healthier water, water filters also produce better tasting water for drinking and cooking thus providing a healthy environment for your whole family. The results of one reading this composition is a good understanding on the topic of Bronchitis Asthma. So do go ahead and read this to learn more about Bronchitis Asthma.

Improve Air Quality
Chlorine vapors can lead to severe respiratory problems like asthma and chronic bronchitis. Whole house water filters will dramatically improve indoor air quality inside your house by preventing the release of chlorine vapors. Remember that it is very important to have a disciplined mode of writing when writing. This is because it is difficult to complete something started if there is no discipline in writing especially when writing on Bronchitis

Healthy Skin
Purified water will prevent many skin diseases and skin problems. Exposure to chlorine has been linked to health problems such as skin irritation, bronchitis, asthma, and even cancer. Chlorine has been proven as one of the major causes of early aging skin and hair. Removing the chlorine in shower water will result in younger, softer skin and healthy looking softer hair. Big Grin.

Juniper berries have long been used as a flavoring in foods and alcoholic beverages such as gin. Gin's original preparation was used for kidney ailments. Immature berries are green, taking 2 to 3 years to ripen to a purplish blue-black. The active component is a volatile oil, which is 0.2% to 3.4% of the berry. The best described effect is diuresis, caused by terpinene-4-01, which results from a direct irritation to the kidney, leading to increased glomerular filtration rate. Juniper berries are available as ripe berry, also called berry-like cones or mature female cones, fresh or dried, and as powder, tea, tincture, oil, or liquid extract.
  • Juniper berries may be applied topically to treat small wounds and relieve muscle and joint pain caused by rheumatism.
  • The fragrance is inhaled as steam to treat bronchitis.
  • The oil is used as a fragrance in many soaps and cosmetics.
  • Juniper berries are the principle flavoring agent in gin, as well as some bitters and liqueurs.
  • Using our imagination has helped us create a wonderful article on Bronchitis.
  • Being imaginative is indeed very important when writing about Bronchitis!

Women who are pregnant or breast-feeding should avoid juniper because of its uterine stimulant and abortifacient properties. Juniper shouldn't be used by those with renal insufficiency, inflammatory disorders of the GI tract (such as Crohn's disease), seizure disorders, or known hypersensitivity. It shouldn't be used topically on large ulcers or wounds because it may cause local irritation. Even the beginner will get to learn more about Bronchitis after reading this article. It is written in easy language so that everyone will be able to understand it.

Safety Risk Kidney damage may occur in patients taking juniper for extended periods. This effect may stem from prolonged kidney irritation caused by terpinene-4-ol or by tur pentine oil contamination ofjuniper products. We have not included any imaginary or false information on Bronchitis here. Everything here is true and up to the mark!

There may be additive hypoglycemic effects when juniper is combined with other herbs that lower blood glucose level, such as Asian ginseng, dandelion, fenugreek, and Siberian ginseng. Juniper may have additive effects with other herbs causing diuresis, such as cowslip, cucumber, dandelion, and horsetail. Suppressing our knowledge on Avoid the flu and bronchitis at work our intention here. In fact, we mean to let everyone know more about Treat Bronchitis after reading this!
  • Safety Risk Juniper may cause seizures, kidney failure, and spontaneous abortion.
  • Clinical considerations Advise patient that he shouldn't take juniper preparations for longer than 4 weeks.

Administration Dried ripe berries: 1 to 2 g by mouth three times a day; maximum 10 g dried berries daily, equaling 20 to 100 mg essential oil Liquid extract (1:1 in 25% alcohol): 2 to 4 ml by mouth three times a day This is a dependable source of information on Bronchitis. All that has to be done to verify its authenticity is to read it!

Inform patient that urine may turn purplish with higher doses of juniper. Tell patient to avoid applying juniper to large ulcers or wounds because local irritation (burning, blistering, redness, and edema) may occur. We have avoided adding flimsy points on Bronchitis, as we find that the addition of such points have no effect on Bronchitis.

Reported Uses
Juniper berries are used to treat urinary tract infections and kidney stones. They're also used as a carminative and for multiple nonspecific GI tract disorders, including dyspepsia, flatulence, colic, heartburn, anorexia, and inflammatory GI disorders. We have included some fresh and interesting information on Bronchitis. In this way, you are updated on the developments of Bronchitis.

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  • Warn patient not to confuse juniper with cade oil, which is derived from juniper wood.
  • Advise female patient to report planned or suspected pregnancy before using juniper.
  • Research summary Juniper may have some benefit in diabetic treatment, but further study is necessary.
  • Juniper has an extensive toxicology profile, and therefore must be used with caution.
  • Overdose of juniper may cause seizures, tachycardia, hypertension, and renal failure with albuminuria, hematuria, and purplish urine.
  • Monitor blood pressure and potassium, BUN, creatinine, and blood glucose level.

Quote:As a food, maximum flavoring concentrations are 0.01% of the extract or 0.006% of the volatile oil. Other reported effects of juniper include hypoglycemia, hypotension or hypertension, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic effects, and stimulation of uterine activity leading to decreased implantation and increased abortifacient effects. We cannot be blamed if you find any other article resembling the matter we have written here about Bronchitis. What we have done here is our copyright material!

Tincture (1:5 in 45% alcohol): 1 to 2 ml by mouth three times a day. Hazards Adverse reactions to juniper include local irritation and metrorrhagia. When used with antidiabetics such as chlorpropamide, glipizide, and glyburide, hypoglycemic effects may be potentiated. Concomitant use of juniper and anti-hypertensives may interfere with blood pressure. Juniper may potentiate the effects of diuretics such as furosemide, leading to additive hypokalemia. A disulfiram-like reaction could occur because of alcohol content of juniper extract. It was our decision to write so much on Bronchitis after finding out that there is still so much to learn on Bronchitis.

Caution Against Using Alcohol While Taking Juniper
Recommend that patient seek medical diagnosis before taking juniper. Unadvised use of juniper could worsen urinary problems, bronchitis, GI disorders, and other conditions if medical diagnosis and proper treatment are delayed. Enhancing your vocabulary is our intention with the writing of this article on Bronchitis. We have used new and interesting words to achieve this.

Oil (1:5 in 45% alcohol): 03 to 2 ml by mouth three times a day Tea (steep 1 teaspoon crushed berries in 5 oz boiling water for 10 minutes, and then strain): three times a day

The fluoroquinolones are a relatively new group of antibiotics. Fluoroquinolones were first introduced in 1986, but they are really modified quinolones, a class of antibiotics, whose accidental discovery occurred in the early 1960.

Because of their expanded antimicrobial spectrum, third-generation fluoroquinolones are useful in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, acute sinusitis and acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, which are their primary FDA-labeled indications. The third-generation fluoroquinolones include levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin and sparfloxacin.

Second-generation agents include ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, lomefloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin is the most potent fluoroquinolone against P. aeruginosa. Ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin are the most widely used second-generation quinolones because of their availability in oral and intravenous formulations and their broad set of FDA-labeled indications. There are universal applications on Bronchitis everywhere. However, it is up to us to decide the way used for these applications to get the best results from them.

All of the fluoroquinolones are effective in treating urinary tract infections caused by susceptible organisms. They are the first-line treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis in patients who cannot tolerate sulfonamides or TMP, who live in geographic areas with known resistance > 10% to 20% to TMP-SMX, or who have risk factors for such resistance.

The newer fluoroquinolones have a wider clinical use and a broader spectrum of antibacterial activity including gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Some of the newer fluoroquinolones have an important role in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and intra-abdominal infections.

Because of concern about hepatotoxicity, trovafloxacin therapy should be reserved for life- or limb-threatening infections requiring inpatient treatment (hospital or long-term care facility), and the drug should be taken for no longer than 14 days.

Fluoroquinolones are approved for use only in people older than 18. They can affect the growth of bones, teeth, and cartilage in a child or fetus. The FDA has assigned fluoroquinolones to pregnancy risk category C, indicating that these drugs have the potential to cause teratogenic or embryocidal effects. Giving fluoroquinolones during pregnancy is not recommended unless the benefits justify the potential risks to the fetus. These agents are also excreted in breast milk and should be avoided during breast-feeding if at all possible. As you progress deeper and deeper into this composition on Chronic Bronchitis, you are sure to unearth more information on Chronic Bronchitis. The information becomes more interesting as the deeper you venture into the composition.

Gastrointestinal Effects
The most common adverse events experienced with fluoroquinolone administration are gastrointestinal (nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, and abdominal pain), which occur in 1 to 5% of patients. CNS effects. Headache, dizziness, and drowsiness have been reported with all fluoroquinolones. Insomnia was reported in 3-7% of patients with ofloxacin. Severe CNS effects, including seizures, have been reported in patients receiving trovafloxacin. Seizures may develop within 3 to 4 days of therapy but resolve with drug discontinuation. Although seizures are infrequent, fluoroquinolones should be avoided in patients with a history of convulsion, cerebral trauma, or anoxia. No seizures have been reported with levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, and gemifloxacin. With the older non-fluorinated quinolones neurotoxic symptoms such as dizziness occurred in about 50% of the patients. Phototoxicity. Exposure to ultraviolet A rays from direct or indirect sunlight should be avoided during treatment and several days (5 days with sparfloxacin) after the use of the drug. The degree of phototoxic potential of fluoroquinolones is as follows: lomefloxacin > sparfloxacin > ciprofloxacin > norfloxacin = ofloxacin = levofloxacin = gatifloxacin = moxifloxacin. Musculoskeletal effects. Concern about the development of musculoskeletal effects, evident in animal studies, has led to the contraindication of fluoroquinolones for routine use in children and in women who are pregnant or lactating. Tendon damage (tendinitis and tendon rupture). Although fluoroquinolone-related tendinitis generally resolves within one week of discontinuation of therapy, spontaneous ruptures have been reported as long as nine months after cessation of fluoroquinolone use. Potential risk factors for tendinopathy include age >50 years, male gender, and concomitant use of corticosteroids. Hepatoxicity. Trovafloxacin use has been associated with rare liver damage, which prompted the withdrawal of the oral preparations from the U.S. market. However, the IV preparation is still available for treatment of infections so serious that the benefits outweigh the risks. Cardiovascular effects. The newer quinolones have been found to produce additional toxicities to the heart that were not found with the older compounds. Evidence suggests that sparfloxacin and grepafloxacin may have the most cardiotoxic potential. Hypoglycemia/Hyperglycemia. Recently, rare cases of hypoglycemia have been reported with gatifloxacin and ciprofloxacin in patients also receiving oral diabetic medications, primarily sulfonylureas. Although hypoglycemia has been reported with other fluoroquinolones (levofloxacin and moxifloxacin), the effects have been mild. Hypersensitivity. Hypersensitivity reactions occur only occasionally during quinolone therapy and are generally mild to moderate in severity, and usually resolve after treatment is stopped. What we have written here about Chronic Bronchitis can be considered to be a unique composition on Chronic Bronchitis. Let's hope you appreciate it being unique. Smile

First Generation
The first-generation agents include cinoxacin and nalidixic acid, which are the oldest and least often used quinolones. These drugs had poor systemic distribution and limited activity and were used primarily for gram-negative urinary tract infections. Cinoxacin and nalidixic acid require more frequent dosing than the newer quinolones, and they are more susceptible to the development of bacterial resistance. Saying that all death by cigarettes here is all there is on Chronic Bronchitis would be an understatement. Very much more has to be learnt and propagated bout Chronic Bronchitis.

Fluoroquinolones Disadvantages:
Tendonitis or tendon rupture Multiple drug interactions Not used in children Newer quinolones produce additional toxicities to the heart that were not found with the older agents We do hope that you find the information here something worth recommending others to read and think about once you complete reading all there is about Bronchitis.

Second Generation
The second-generation fluoroquinolones have increased gram-negative activity, as well as some gram-positive and atypical pathogen coverage. Compared with first-generation quinolones, these drugs have broader clinical applications in the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections and pyelonephritis, sexually transmitted diseases, selected pneumonias and skin infections. It is only if you find some usage for the matter described here on Chronic Bronchitis that we will feel the efforts put in writing on Chronic Bronchitis fruitful. So make good usage of it!

Classification of Fluoroquinolones
As a group, the fluoroquinolones have excellent in vitro activity against a wide range of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The newest fluoroquinolones have enhanced activity against gram-positive bacteria with only a minimal decrease in activity against gram-negative bacteria. Their expanded gram-positive activity is especially important because it includes significant activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae. We hope you develop a better understanding of Bronchitis on completion of this article on Bronchitis. Only if the article is understood is it's benefit reached.

Side Effects
The fluoroquinolones as a class are generally well tolerated. Most adverse effects are mild in severity, self-limited, and rarely result in treatment discontinuation. However, they can have serious adverse effects. Looking for something logical on Chronic Bronchitis, we stumbled on the information provided here. Look out for anything illogical here.

Fluoroquinolones Advantages:
Ease of administration Daily or twice daily dosing Excellent oral absorption Excellent tissue penetration Prolonged half-lives Significant entry into phagocytic cells Efficacy Overall safety The title of this composition could be rightly be Chronic Bronchitis. This is because what is mentioned here is mostly about Chronic Bronchitis.

Urinary tract infections (norfloxacin, lomefloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, trovafloxacin) Lower respiratory tract infections (lomefloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, trovafloxacin) Skin and skin-structure infections (ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, trovafloxacin) Urethral and cervical gonococcal infections (norfloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, trovafloxacin) Prostatitis (norfloxacin, ofloxacin, trovafloxacin) Acute sinusitis (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin (Avelox), trovafloxacin) Acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (levofloxacin, sparfloxacin (Zagam), gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, trovafloxacin) Community-acquired pneumonia (levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, trovafloxacin) So after reading what we have mentioned here on Bronchitis, it is up to you to provide your verdict as to what exactly it is that you find fascinating here.